A brief timeline:


•April 16, 1923 - Pride of Judea Orphan Home, 992 Dumont Avenue (East New York) Brooklyn, receives its first residents - 75 infants, toddlers and children thru age five.

•January, 1924 - six recently orphaned (Snyder) sisters, four to 13 years old, are admitted to the Pride. Over time there will be a major change in the Home’s age policy when infants and toddlers are not accepted and minimum age is gradually raised to five years.

•1925 - P.S.202 opens its doors, will be elementary school to hundreds of Pride children.

•April, 1930 - The federal census counts 215 residents, 127 boys and 88 girls. More than 75% are less than 10 years old and only 6 of the children are over 13 years old.

•Early 1930’s - The institution’s name is changed to Pride of Judea Children’s Home–in recognition of the fact that many of the residents are not “orphans”.

•August 8, 1933 - A summer outing at Edgemere Beach in the Rockaways turns to tragedy with the drowning deaths of seven boys, ages 10 to 14. •1937 - A third floor is added and new dormitories accommodate all of the girl residents.

•November 9, 1938 - Max Blumberg, the Home’s founder and president, dies while broadcasting an appeal for contributions. Jacob H. Cohen is named to succeed him.

•1930’s +- Memorable staff members include: Dr. Demick; Nurse Gorelick; housekeeper- Mrs. Gatner; her assistant-Mrs. Silver; “Mama” Braverman and “security”-Ben Karp. •Early 1940’s- Pride population peaks at about 275 residents, with even distribution of ages from five to 18. Popular boys’ supervisors include: Lou Feigelson; Sam Arcus and “Mr. Charles” Vladimer. Miltie Schneider, who was admitted in December, 1923 when he was nine days old, is discharged in July 1941, age 17 ½ - the longest tenured resident.

•During WW II (1941- 1945) - More than 90 former residents and staff personnel serve in military with four known killed in action, including Major Maxwell J. Pappurt, PJCH superintendent, 1939-41. On the “home front” a victory garden gets the kids approval.

•1943 - A major benefactor, Martin Scharf, donates two homes in Long Beach which will provide the Home’s children with many enjoyable summer vacations.

•Post WWII - Number of residents and new admissions begin to decline. Efforts by supervisors Charlie Vladimer, Harry Koval et al. to unionize, end with their dismissal.

•1950’s - Population continues to drop and there are no new admissions after 1954. In June, 1958 arrangements are made for placement of the remaining 30 adolescent children. After 35 years of service the Pride of Judea Children’s Home ceases to exist, but----

•1959 - A new name and mission for the agency- Pride of Judea Mental Health Center.

•1972 - Center relocates to Douglaston, Queens County- where it provides, on non-sectarian basis, psychiatric services to area residents (Paula Held to become director).

•June, 1985 - An alumni chapter of former PJCH residents is established and named in honor of the late Rose Nadler Schefer who lived in the Home for 16 years. She became a nurse and an active volunteer at the mental health clinic and dreamed of an alumni organization that would assist the “new” Pride in its important work. Since its inception, the PJCH alumni chapter and individual members make financial contributions to this successor agency which, in turn, publishes the Newsletter and hosts the annual brunch.

•September, 1998 - An Orphan Has Many Parents is a publication and alumni success.

•1999 - The Center becomes a division of Jewish Board for Family & Children Services.

•Fall, 2001 - Renamed Pride of Judea Community Services- offers outpatient services and a wide variety of programs for very diverse population of Northeast Queens.